Pasta With Mushrooms & Garden Veggies

Eggplant, beet “greens,” tomatoes and cayenne pepper were the gardens’ contribution to this dish.

It started with onions, garlic, celery and green cayenne pepper being sautéed with olive oil. Half of the cayenne pepper would have been plenty.

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

 

Tomatoes were then added and the sauce was left to simmer under a lid.

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

 

While the sauce was simmering the eggplant slices and mushrooms were seared and browned in a dry pan.

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

 

The eggplant and mushrooms were then added to the tomato sauce.

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

 

The beet tops should have been added at the same time as the tomatoes but they were a bit of an afterthought, so they were cooked separately before being added into the sauce.

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

 

Kosher salt, frozen basil purée, frozen oregano purée and a pinch of black pepper were added for seasoning.

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

 

The veggie tomato sauce was served over brown rice macaroni.

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies

 

To add a little protein and interest to the meal I stuffed homegrown home pickled jalapeños with a mixture of peanut butter and mango chutney. I got the idea from Lea Ann of highlandsranchfoodie.com HERE.

I used old fashioned style peanut butter which doesn’t have hydrogenated oils or palm oil so it was a bit runny. The mango chutney was also runny, so I thickened the mixture with peanut powder.

stuffed jalapeños

stuffed jalapeños

stuffed jalapeños

stuffed jalapeños

 

For the best flavor experience Lea Ann recommends popping the entire thing into your mouth rather than taking smaller bites.

Brown rice macaroni & garden veggies



 

 


2 thoughts on “Pasta With Mushrooms & Garden Veggies

  1. I just tossed the remaining inch or so of peanut powder as it had gone rancid. High time, too, as it was probably three or four years old. I can’t remember what I used it for – maybe stirring it into cooked cereal. Seemed like a good idea at the time, but we didn’t really eat it much. I had to force myself to remember to put it into the cereal. Probably good for Malaysian-type cooking, but I don’t do that, either.

    I did keep the nicely-shaped and sized plastic jar, though, to store dry things in.

    Virtual hugs,

    Judie

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve had the peanut powder for some time too and don’t use it often. I store it in the freezer. There is a freezer out on the porch devoted mostly for dry ingredients like nuts, seeds, whole grain flours and other things that can turn rancid.

      Liked by 1 person

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