Red Hot Pepper Sauce 2 Ways

If you have the impression that I am obsessed with peppers, especially the hot varieties, you would be correct. Peppers in the garden are at their peak and must be enjoyed now or somehow preserved to enjoy later when not in season. Over the years I have flash frozen them, pickled and canned them and dehydrated them. I have also preserved peppers by making hot sauce. It is a good way to deal with a lot of peppers all at once.

My favorite method of making hot sauce is by lacto-fermentation. I started a batch of red peppers fermenting on July 30th and mentioned the procedure in this post. I had said that I would leave it to ferment for a few weeks, but here it’s been just two weeks and my curiosity has gotten the better of me. I have had good results in the past with two week ferments so why not?

It is just a matter of squeezing the liquid from the fermented mash, blending in a pinch or two of xanthan gum to keep the sauce from separating then filling the bottles.

hot sauce

hot sauce

hot sauce

 

hot sauce

 

Most commercial hot sauces are made with vinegar. I like them all, but I much prefer a fermented hot sauce for its distinctive, superb flavor. But since more ripe peppers had accumulated in the fridge and needed to be used I decided to go with a quicker vinegar based hot sauce this time. The methods for both types of hot sauce are pretty much the same, the differences being the use of vinegar versus salt and the fermentation time.

I loaded up the blender with roughly chopped assorted red chili peppers and blended them to a pulp using raw apple cider vinegar to facilitate blending. There were even a few homegrown Tabasco peppers in the mix. Mine were picked a bit prematurely. The pepper pickers for Tabasco brand Tabasco sauce carry a red painted wand (baton rouge) into the field with them for reference to the proper shade of red.

hot sauce

hot sauce

hot sauce

 

The vinegary liquid was then drained and squeezed from the ground up peppers.

hot sauce

hot sauce (9).jpg

 

I added kosher salt, a little sugar and xanthan gum before bottling.

hot sauce

hot sauce

hot sauce



 


10 thoughts on “Red Hot Pepper Sauce 2 Ways

    1. We usually have a few hot sauce bottles going at the same time, red and green homemade and a commercial brand or two. We usually use up a couple of them a few times a year.

      I also use fresh hot peppers generously in cooking so there are many dishes that might otherwise get doused with hot sauce that don’t call for it.

      The hot sauces most often come out at the breakfast table for egg and potato dishes. But also for salads and Tex-Mex type foods.

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    1. Thank you! Significant space could be freed up in the refrigerator if I could figure out how to can the hot sauce in dispenser size bottles to give as gifts. I’ve successfully gotten second hand larger bottles with screw on metal caps (such as Mickey’s Wide Mouth) to seal properly, and, of course, regular canning jars which aren’t convenient for table use.

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      1. Hahaha! Evidently so. In addition to the “le petite baton rouge” used by the pepper pickers and the red pole marking a territorial boundary, there were the red war clubs wielded by the Creek Indian tribe. It must be the limitations of the French language that labeled so many different items as “baton rouge.” I hope the enterprising manufacturer of red sticks didn’t get his orders confused and produce boundary markers when it was supposed to have been war clubs! Nor would the Creek warriors have been pleased if their order for war clubs arrived in the form of tiny little wands.

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