Mulching & Munching

Finally got around to mulching the garden area. Eight bales of wheat straw and I’m still not quite done. The mulch will keep the mud off our feet, discourage weeds, and the weeds that do come up will be easier to pull. It is also hoped that mulching will prevent soil borne diseases from infecting the tomato plants.

I marked the perimeters of two round ground level beds with green paint so the thin metal borders won’t be stepped on and crushed.

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I didn’t mulch this bed, at least not yet, because of all the volunteer cilantro, basil and purslane growing amongst the pepper plants. These things come up wild every year.

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Purslane is a weed which grows in gardens almost the world over. The plant is a powerhouse of nutrition including more omega-3 essential fatty acids than any other plant and even some fish oils. It even has a type of omega-3 generally found only in fish or algae. The list of vitamins and minerals purslane contains is extensive but not the focus of this post. I only mention it to explain why I allow it to grow in my garden.

I harvested some purslane to use today in our first cookout of the season.

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I also harvested some young amaranth leaves, another weed which grows prolifically in the garden.

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I wrapped the amaranth leaves, purslane and homegrown asparagus in foil to cook on the charcoal grill.

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Also on the menu were grilled jicama and roasted homegrown radishes. The peeled and sliced jicama and halved radishes were coated with avocado oil, salt and pepper. The radishes were wrapped in foil and the jicama slices were placed directly on the grill.

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When the radishes and jicama were done cooking I doused them with a marinade consisting of cilantro, jalapeño and white balsamic vinegar.

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We also had roasted corn the way I like it, rubbed with a wedge of lime dipped in a mixture of chili powder, cumin, pink salt and oregano.

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Faye grilled a couple pork chops for herself and I had just the veggies.

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The meal was half over before we remembered the mashed potato salad Faye had made. It included some sweet yellow squash relish I had made in July of 2017, still just as crunchy and good.

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7 thoughts on “Mulching & Munching

  1. You garden is an absolute haven for plant life! So many great foods are growing, no wonder you always have such a great ingredient list! Your feast looked delicious as always, I’ve never tasted corn with those flavors on it. Time to try something new!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There are a lot of things I would like to grow but don’t even try anymore because of the hoards of bugs that utterly destroy them.

      Roasted corn is a popular street food in India. The lime dipped in salt and chili powder is rubbed on after the corn is roasted over charcoal. I’ve seen is sold like that on the streets in Mexico too.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I get that, but with birds. The birds make me mad taking more than their fair share.

        The roasting over charcoal sounds like the secret ingredient, love it!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. The only trouble I’ve had with birds has been the mockingbirds pecking holes in strawberries and tomatoes. They never eat an entire tomato or strawberry. They peck a hole in each and every one if them. Never had birds harming seedlings — until maybe now. Something, either bird or squirrel, ate every one of the sunflower sprouts as soon as they came up. Bought some more seeds today.

        I’ve considered purchasing a gas grill but then think, naw, I like charcoal!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Uhg yes! That’s happened to me before too, with tomatoes! (I’ve never grown strawberries…) It’s infuriating because it’s like, if you’re going to poke your beak in it, at least take the whole thing and finish eating it! So wasteful and rude for them just to poke holes in everything and we get nothing. I saw some net bags for tomatoes, while I was searching for blackberry netting, on Amazon the other day…. might give them a shot, they were inexpensive.

        So sorry to hear about your sunflower sprouts! Those animals just have no respect for all a gardeners efforts.

        Liked by 1 person

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